Femme-made erotica and porn

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April 29, 2006

When I first began writing about porn I talked to some women I'd previously worked with in a conservative office environment. I was reluctant to discuss my new found career, after all porn is supposedly debasing to women, giving men thoughts about how every female is a cum vessel and that 'no' is just a word girls use in dirty talk. Much to my surprise I discovered that women wanted porn that spoke to them, particularly they wanted believable erotica.

One former co-worker explained that her husband had bought a collection of short erotic stories for women. They read it together and where his cock was stiffening her laughter stifled any potential passion that evening.

"Give me a break," she recounted. "How can anyone not laugh hysterically at a scene where the grocery boy takes a female customer right there in the middle of aisle three at peak shopping hours!"

I saw her point, and think many women would because they want something that speaks to their fantasies of themselves as real and highly sexual beings with kinks, twists and raw energy. As we talked, we both questioned whether a man with a female nom-de-plume had written that book?

The Erotic Readers and Writers Association explains that there's five female fantasies which stand out among others and viewing them I note that each speaks more to the reality of sex and the possibility of living out fantasy than a high-noon fuckfest at Walmart.

While one's sex is not a barrier to writing porn that appeals to various readers, it seems that gender is often vital in delivering literary styles, perspectives and narratives that appeal to women. What makes authors like Anne Rampling, Anais Nin and Marguerite Duras so different than their male counterparts is that they write of their own feminine experiences and often employ their own language which is sometimes poetic, romantic, playful, intelligent and often free from stifling and restrictive stereotypes found in many books written by men, and which encompass variations on Robert Graves' concept of The White Goddess, or the wife, witch and whore.

However, if gender is important to style and the reception of literary readers, then it should follow that it's also crucial to producers, websites like Sssh.com and audiences of porn. In part two, I'll discuss how porn made for women and by women differentiates to a certain extent from the male-made movies that dominate the industry.

Posted by sloth at April 29, 2006 4:03 AM

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